another segmented vessel

Any form of wood turning using wood parts glued together. Staves, ring segments, laminations, etc.

another segmented vessel

Postby loyd » Fri Oct 27, 2017 8:58 pm

I went through a period of making one segmented vessel after another -- at least a couple dozen or so -- beginning with a visit to Provo, UT in 2004 and lasting several years. I admire some of the segmented work that people do and was pleased with the ones I made -- at least most of them. But, at some point a few years ago, I realized that once the design was done there exists a period between the design and the actual turning that really can be boring. I don't know what the average segmented turning might represent in the way of the number of segments but whatever it is, it's more than I can endure without regret that I started the project. There! I've said it and now it's out in the open.

Now, if you're wondering, I have a reason for bring this up. I drew my step-son's name in the Christmas drawing this year. That means I have to present him with a significant gift and everyone expects me to produce a wood item. I asked my sweet wife [it's her son after all] for an idea which she immediately provided. There's a place in his house that had a vacant place between the living room and the hallway and above the air conditioner intake plenum, so the builder decided to present him with a 'nook' to display a piece of art. My sweet wife figured that a large, 18" high, wood turning would be just the ticket. No matter how you cut it, an 18" tall segmented vessel is going to have a lot of segments that have to be cut, one at a time. The design is done, and there will be a long interval [the length of which will depend somewhat on my ability to concentrate on the task at hand] before turning can begin. Stay tuned.
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Re: another segmented vessel

Postby rgulley » Sat Oct 28, 2017 1:52 pm

I'll have to agree with you Loyd. I think segmented turnings are amazing, even the basic ring patterns. The intricate patterns just floor me. But I don't think I have the skill, patience, or fortitude to ever even start such a project.

Maybe it takes the same kind of mindset of folk who build large models with matches, toothpicks, or popsicle sticks. I admire their endurance, but I don't think I could do it.
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Re: another segmented vessel

Postby loyd » Sat Oct 28, 2017 4:09 pm

Or the ship in a bottle thing. Shutter! :roll: :!:
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Re: another segmented vessel

Postby southpaw57 » Sun Oct 29, 2017 11:53 am

I am about to "get up the nerve" to try segmented items. :geek:
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Re: another segmented vessel

Postby loyd » Sun Oct 29, 2017 12:41 pm

:roll:
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Re: another segmented vessel

Postby sid_matheny » Mon Oct 30, 2017 2:31 pm

I love seeing segmented vessels but don't enjoy making them very much. They are great when finished but can be a pain at times getting them the way you want.
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Re: another segmented vessel

Postby loyd » Mon Oct 30, 2017 3:31 pm

You know another thing I hate about segmented stuff? The trick of being successful with it is to mill your lumber [for all rings -- not all but two] before you work to get your angle set just right. Then you can cut all your segments without moving anything but your reference stop. See, if you forget those final two rings, you have to risk your 'angle' setup by moving your sled [or miter gauge] out of the way to mill them. With that hanging over my head, I came to a stop this afternoon to gather my thoughts by taking a long walk.

Of course, I could switch to using a miter saw as some others do, but I don't think I want to retrain myself nor to dodge flying segments.

:oops:
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Re: another segmented vessel

Postby loyd » Tue Oct 31, 2017 7:34 pm

My choice of 18 segments for each ring was based on a simple notion -- actually two -- that a 12 segment ring is too coarse and 16 requires an uneven angle of cut [11.25 degrees]. So 18 seemed pretty good to me -- pretty fine look and a cut angle of 10 degrees. So that was the decision process.

Of course that means that each ring requires a minimum of 19 cuts. Since there are 28 rings in my design due to the requirement for an 18" tall vessel, the total number of segments turns out to be 504 thus 532 angled cuts. Then you take the segments for each ring, apply the glue to both surfaces [36 if you're counting] and stick them together, put the ring clamp on and tighten. Then there's the thing about glue: if it sticks to the segments, it will also stick to your fingers; which by the way will make it hard to detach each segment from your finger and put it where it needs to be in the ring.

With all that done and your angle is exact you have only that one glue-up to deal with; however, if on the other hand your angle is off just a tiny bit [ever hear the term micro-radians?] there will be gaps that, if not corrected, will be unsightly in the final ring and in some cases stick out like a sore thumb. So how to combat that dreaded gap? Well the usual practice is to check the ring before the glue is applied by putting it in the ring clamp and tightening it up so you can hold the disk up to a light and check to see the gaps.

Gaps? That's simple enough; just glue up the disk in two halves and sand the mating surfaces so that they mate well and glue them together. On some rings the tiny little inaccuracies in angle compensate and you don't need to do the half-ing trick, but then there are those other times and a small error multiplies over an 18 segment ring.

Of course, it's best to get your angles exact and check them often. But since you're making all those cuts [19 per ring in my case] it's easy to get lax and get a poor cut or two in the ring and even if your angle is exact a poor cut can leave a segment not quite exactly right.

If you've read this far in my rant, you're probably wondering why he has written all this rant anyway. Well, part of it is to blow off steam but I figure that anyone wanting to do this needs to be prepared. SO!

I suggest, as I have in my programs on this in the past, that if you're getting into this do it sensibly. My suggestion is to start simple with six or eight rings and no more than 12 segments. That's enough to get experience but not too much to endure. After that, you can experiment with bigger projects knowing what you're getting into.

And no! I'm not trying to discourage you from doing this, just trying to prepare you. Also, to blow off steam. :oops: :o
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Re: another segmented vessel

Postby southpaw57 » Wed Nov 01, 2017 7:18 am

About talked me out of it!!!!!!! :geek:
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Re: another segmented vessel

Postby loyd » Wed Nov 01, 2017 7:45 am

Let's talk! 8-)
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