Oh Boy!

Computer Numerical Control

Re: Oh Boy!

Postby sid_matheny » Sun Nov 26, 2017 1:59 pm

I noticed Frank Howarth is using Vcarve Pro in his latest video. Not sure what version.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R2n1FqAR7Wc
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Re: Oh Boy!

Postby loyd » Sun Nov 26, 2017 7:57 pm

That guy uses his CNC machine for just about everything [bacon thing not withstanding]. I watched the video you posted of him making that machine a while back and wished I had the space for something like that. Now that I've had the Shark for a couple of years and realize that it's only one tool of many, I've learned that other tools are better for some things. Bob and I decided that the table saw was often a better choice for cutting things out than the CNC process and I'm sure there are other things that fall into that category. On the other hand there aren't many tools that will flatten a large piece like his door as well as a CNC. Still, I'm very impressed with his joining of those large slabs using the CNC and I don't think that would have worked out so well [following the grain] without the CNC.

BTW: I wonder if he gets help with his video making. There is, after all, just 24 hours in a standard day. And, I have a lot of trouble getting much done in most of them. :oops:
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Re: Oh Boy!

Postby sid_matheny » Tue Nov 28, 2017 12:48 pm

I think he does all the video himself.
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Re: Oh Boy!

Postby loyd » Sat Dec 02, 2017 11:40 am

first version 9 3d.jpg


My first use of the Vcarve Pro ver 9 software. I learned a lot with this effort including the futility of using figured wood with detail design. The carving was a success, pretty much, but the overall appearance . . . not so good.
Overall it was a positive experience. The output will likely be set aside in the company of other cnc experiments but perhaps the learning stays with me.
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Re: Oh Boy!

Postby loyd » Sat Dec 02, 2017 3:01 pm

I ran a second 3d image this afternoon.

ydirection chatter.jpg


Note the chatter on the side [Y direction] of the roughing opening. It's there in the photo in the previous post but not as vivid. I'm guessing there is a harmonic in the Y movement. The chatter isn't there in the fine carving [the inside rectangle]. Rough carving is done with a 1/4" end mill. The fine carving is done with a 1/8" tapered round nose bit. I need to check my feeds and speeds. I may be asking that end mill to go too fast.

No end to the lessons one can learn. Now! If only one could remember them. :lol:
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Re: Oh Boy!

Postby loyd » Sun Dec 17, 2017 1:30 pm

horse.jpg


Another 3d CNC thing. Nothing special on my part other than importing the 3d design and sizing it to fit the work piece. Vcarve Pro 9 will render 3d models if you have them, but you can't create a design on the 3d part itself. This piece took about 15 minutes for the roughing tool path and then about 65 minutes for the finishing tool path. It's just a training project and I learned a few things:
1. I referenced the model in the center [X,Y,Z] at the center on the top surface of the work piece. That usually works well for me and in the case of the roughing and finishing tool paths, the Z reference worked fine [the roughing left the center point at work piece top surface]; however, there's a feature to clean up the edges of the finishing run and it's Z reference is also the center of the top surface of the work piece which isn't there after the finishing run. So to get a good Z reference, you need to move the bit to a place where that surface is available or fake it [which is what I attempted to do but failed by a few mils which caused a very visible perimeter defect]. Done the other way would have been better than faking it.
2. There's always going to be a fraction of the stepper incremental distance in error [+/- half the increment] so setting the edge treatment Z depth needs to NOT attempt to get directly on the level of the model. That's easy enough to do if you pay attention.

Lessons learned on training exercises will, one hopes, not need relearning on the real thing.
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Re: Oh Boy!

Postby sid_matheny » Sun Dec 17, 2017 6:57 pm

WOW that looks great Loyd! Did you have to do any sanding or did it come out that smooth?
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Re: Oh Boy!

Postby loyd » Sun Dec 17, 2017 7:27 pm

The only sanding needed was where the edging path was too deep. I messed that up and it looks pretty ragged. I'll avoid that problem in the next attempt by being careful of the depth of that edging procedure.

There is a bit of a problem on the edge of the larger opening rectangle where the 1/4" end mill seemed to chatter. I think I have that problem figured out and may be able to avoid it in future. In my ignorance of the methods available, I did the edging of that larger rectangle AFTER the raster process of cleaning out the wide area. That left the end mill running single sided rather than in a groove. That invites chatter. If I had done the edging first [which is an option] it would have made a groove BEFORE the raster thus the bit would have been better supported. Bob A. told me about that issue a couple of years ago but I just discovered the way it can be avoided after running the project today.

There was a bit of fuzz around the edges of the rectangles but that came off with a bit of 220 grit paper. As far as the horse itself -- no sanding at all.
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Re: Oh Boy!

Postby doylemc » Wed Dec 20, 2017 1:53 pm

Do one of those photographs that shows through plastic or something.
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Re: Oh Boy!

Postby loyd » Wed Dec 20, 2017 6:18 pm

Doyle, Follow this link to see Richard's finished lithophane. http://www.tnvalleywoodclub.org/forum/download/file.php?id=308&mode=view
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